Prepare A 72 Hour Kit Of Emergency Supplies – ‘Just In Case’

Prepare a 72 hour kit of emergency supplies so you can be self-sufficient in an emergency if outside help does not come quickly.

Prepare a 72 hour kit of emergency supplies so you can be self-sufficient in an emergency if outside help does not come quickly.

Previous posts have dealt with more straightforward emergency preparedness, such as having a list of important phone numbers handy, keeping emergency cash around, having some emergency water storage, or even making sure your car is fuelled up. But the ’72 hour kit’ requires a bit more planning and preparing.

In more serious emergencies, or disasters, emergency services are always stretched to breaking point. They will be preoccupied with the people at greatest risk and, surprise, whatever we might think that might not be us. Generally speaking it is recommended that households be prepared to fend for themselves for at least the first 3 days (72 hours) of any emergency situation.

In some emergency situations it might simply be a case of sitting tight, and surviving on our own, until normality returns or help arrives. In other situations it might be necessary to evacuate quickly, in which case the portability of our 72 hour kit is essential. If we are able to take our kit with us we can still fend for ourselves wherever we temporarily relocate to, and we reduce how much we are a burden on at emergency services at public evacuation centres, or on friends, or family, who might arrange accomodation for us. Few of us would have time to think properly about what we would need in such a situation, it’s much better to prepare in advance.

Each person’s needs are unique, and you should take time to consider exactly what would be essential if you had to leave your home, or had no access to shops or services, for 3 days.

Emergency Food Storage

Remember to include long-life food in your emergency supplies…

Your 72 hour kit should be personalised to meet yours, and your family’s, specific needs. The main categories of items to think about are:

While you think about the specifics you need for you and yours, such as special medication or sanitary items, consider some of these common 72 hour kit items:

Nobody looks forward to the kind of emergency that requires this preparation, but we know that even in the UK some recent emergencies have required evacuation. Such as the Nuclear Weapons factory in Berkshire a few years ago, the Leicester factory fire last year, or the Fish Processing factory in Peterhead this year. At SurvivalWarehouse.co.uk we recommend preparation, not panic, every time. There’s no doubt that being prepared brings peace of mind, and reduces stress, fear and worry at hopefully rare moments of crisis. One thing is for certain, should your 72 hour kit ever be needed, you will not be sorry you prepared. Why take the chance when the solution is so simple?

 


Keep A Map In Your Car With Marked Routes ‘Just In Case’

Keep a map, in your car, just in case your GPS or mobile is down. Mark 3 routes to family or friends who can put you up should you need to evacuate.

Keep a map, in your car, just in case your GPS or mobile is down. Mark 3 routes to family or friends who can put you up should you need to evacuate.

Like many drivers perhaps you rely on your local knowledge, your SatNav, or your mobile phone to help you navigate the UK’s highways and byways. On a normal day, with everything working perfectly, this is all fine. But throw in problems with your SatNav signal, mobile phone network and some bad traffic, and it’s time for some stress. Add to that some kind of emergency or disaster and a problem becomes a nightmare. Without your phone or SatNav working, and especially in unfamiliar areas, questions about what alternative routes you could take to avoid major delays are impossible to answer, and you might not feel comfortable or think it wise in all situations and places to ask strangers for directions.

One easy step we can take, to reduce stress and overcome some of the consquences of tech failure, especially in emergencies or disasters, is to keep an up-to-date road map of your area, or road atlas, in your car at all times. If you replace it with a new one every year or two, it will never be too far out of date. Having a map to hand gives you the option of finding alternative routes to avoid delays, or to travel to locations you are unfamiliar with, when you lack your usual electronic helps.

Far less likely, though still possible, will be the need to avoid or escape a major disaster. Last time we looked at some real life examples from the UK, of people being evacuated from their homes because of major fires in their area. Disasters on a larger scale can happen, and it is good to be prepared for these eventualities also. We recommend you have, in advance, somewhere to go in case of this type of emergency. Perhaps you can stay with a family member, a friend, or if you’re lucky a second property, in another area.

Emergency Food Storage

Remember to include long-life food in your emergency supplies…

Once you know where you can go the challenge becomes getting there. Disasters, depending on what they are, can result in closed roads or major traffic jams as lots of people do what you are doing – leave. Having a map in such a situation is essential, given the possibility that the kind of disaster requiring you to leave might also interfere with mobile networks. You might not be able to rely on SatNav re-routing either. We recommend you plan in advance and mark several alternative routes to your emergency destination so there is no delay to your departure. Expect the unexpected, and be ready to change your plans if you have to – if you have a map you will be able to. Of course, make sure you also have enough fuel, knowing where you’re going and the route to take is no use if you can’t make the journey.

Taking this simple precaution can take a lot of stress out of emergency or pressured situations. Why take the chance when the solution is so simple?


Keep Your Car Topped Up With Fuel ‘Just In Case’

Keep your car topped up.

Keep your car topped up with fuel, just in case an emergency means you must drive without delay, or there’s a problem with local fuel supply.

We’re used to being able to drop in to a service station and fuel up our vehicles whenever we’re passing. This sometimes means we habitually run close to empty before filling up. When everything works as we would like this isn’t an issue, but in an emergency suddenly realising your tank is nearly empty can turn a problem into a nightmare.

One really simple thing we can do, to avoid this becoming a major problem, is to keep our cars topped up with fuel more frequently. Decide in advance on a minimum fuel level, in keeping with your car owner’s manual safe operating instructions, and stick to it. The five minutes it takes to fuel up can seem a hassle at the end of a long day at work, but it’s far less hassle than needing to fuel up in an emergency.

Consider a few very possible situations:

  1. You live in a rural area and it’s several miles to the nearest service station. The weather isn’t great and as you pull in you see the pump you need is locked. The weather has caused a delay to the delivery. As you get back into the car you realise there isn’t enough fuel to make the journey to the next nearest station.
  2. You’ve an important appointment this morning some distance away, and as you dress you hear on the news that strike action means petrol shortages and long queues of panic buyers at service stations. You realise it’s not going to be a quick job fuelling up, if they even have any fuel left.
  3. You woke up late, and you’re risking being late for work – again. As you get into your car you realise you need to fuel up or you won’t get there at all. The commuter rush at the service station seals your fate.
  4. A fire at a local factory, such as the Nuclear Weapons factory in Berkshire a few years ago, the Leicester factory fire last year, or the Fish Processing factory in Peterhead this year, means police are evacuating the local area. You wanted to get ahead of the traffic, but you can’t because you need to fuel up first.
  5. One you’ll be reminded of for years to come, your wife finally seems to be going into labour, and instead of having a relatively straightforward journey to the maternity ward, she get’s a five minute stop off at the petrol station on the way. You’ll be lucky if she doesn’t give birth in the car on the way there.
Emergency Food Storage

Remember to include long-life food in your emergency supplies…

We can probably imagine some of these scenarios applying to us, and we haven’t mentioned the most serious either, because we don’t expect them. But maybe we should. If you live in a flood area, can you leave in a hurry? What if you’re hit by some other natural disaster, terrorist attack, shortage, or even if your cash card doesn’t work?

Taking this simple precaution in line with your car users manual, can take a lot of stress out of emergency or pressured situations. Why take the chance when the solution is so simple?


Make a Power Failure Kit For Your Home and Office ‘Just in Case’

Make a power failure kit

Make a power failure kit for your home and office, keep it in an easy to access place, make sure people know where it is.

We’re used to being able to flick a switch for everything from lighting to heating. But in a power cut, especially at night, suddenly the most basic of tasks become a real challenge. Couple that with any other emergency and a problem quickly becomes a nightmare.

One really easy way to reduce the stress at such times is to make a power failure kit. Essential for the home, but also useful at the office, a power failure kit contains essential tools and supplies to make getting on without mains electricity that little bit easier.

Have a special place for your kit, that everyone knows about, you won’t have to be hunting around in the dark trying to pull it all together at the last minute – only to find out too late you don’t have what you need.

To keep things tidy select a storage box, tub, cupboard or shelf to keep your kit until you need it.

Items you might need include:

Emergency Food Storage

Remember to include long-life food in your emergency supplies…

These simple steps can take away the stress of a power cut, making the whole experience much more worry free. Why take the chance when the solution is so simple?


It’s Time To Repair The Roof

The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining.

The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining. John F. Kennedy

There are all kinds of things in our lives that, if left undone in better times, make life more difficult than it needs to be when hard times come.

President John F. Kennedy put it best when he said “the time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining”. It’s about looking ahead at problems, and taking steps to either eliminate them or make them more easily dealt with.

With some problems, like loose roof tiles, it’s easy to understand why it’s important to sort out, and we all understand that fixing the loose slates on a sunny day beats dealing with the leak in the next heavy downpour. Another example might include filling your car up with petrol the night before your long trip, to avoid the early morning commuter rush at the service station.

The point is, that we all understand that taking some steps when it is easy, can reduce stress and panic later.

Of course its less easy to prepare for problems you don’t expect. After all, how many of us expect the food to run out at the supermarket? Or how many of us expect our mains water supply to be cut off for a prolonged period? These are things most of us take for granted, but maybe we shouldn’t.

Some real life examples include water supply problems in 2009 and 2015 in Northern Ireland, which left thousands of homes without water for several days, and even more homes with limited or interrupted supply.The BBC reported one woman’s experience:

“All local supermarkets and garages have sold out of bottled water and there doesn’t appear to be any supplies available…”

Or, what about the winter weather in 2010, which affected deliveries to supermarkets. The Express reported one customer’s experience:

“Staple foods were fast disappearing from supermarket shelves as shoppers who managed to brave the bad weather sought to stock up on essentials such as bread and milk.”

Emergency Food Storage

Remember to include long-life food in your emergency supplies…

Thankfully such events are not frequent, but climate change experts suggest that we will experience more extreme weather.

Even though we might not always be able to take access to food and water for granted, if we are prepared we don’t need to worry – especially when being prepared is very much easier than repairing a roof. It’s simply a case of keeping emergency food and water supplies, in your home. What could be simpler? Especially when you can buy supplies from our very own website.

Think preparation, not panic.


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